Ceramics and flowers for dinner table settings

It’s no secret that ceramics have been all the rage. As online sidekicks vie for sales — at the speed of another Nike drop — of small-batch artists like Suzanne Sullivan, Seth Rogen turns to pottery and Jonathan Adler dedicates a floor of his new flagship from New York to an aquarium sculpture studio. so visitors can see where the real magic happens. Call it crockery, call it earthenware, ceramic is always sweet.

From top left, clockwise: L’AGRAFE; THE FIRE IGNITER; SETTING UP; THE CONVERSATION ROOM; THE HOST GIFT; THE FUTURE LEGACY; THE WATER CARRIER.

THE FUTURE LEGACY
Artist Michelle Wen inserts tiny details into each of her commissioned works. “You’d be surprised how much a person’s identity is expressed in their jars,” says Wen, both buyer and maker. It’s a “daunting legacy” for her, given that the work, like this golden jug, will ultimately outlive her.

THE CONVERSATION ROOM
Mexican-American artist River Valadez calls her three-legged creations her “nubes,” the Spanish word for clouds. “I wanted something that was both a small side table and an informal seat if I needed an extra chair while entertaining.”

FIRE LIGHTER
Suzanne Sullivan’s exquisite jars, cups and candleholders (pictured here) were born out of curiosity and a quest for happiness; a godsend when looking to spice up a gathering, she says. “Parts party before the party even begins!”

THE ESSENTIAL
“A cup is just a cup with a handle,” says Florida-based artist John Quick, who works with vibrant ombré glazes. “But what excites me about a cup is the endless possibilities within that broad definition. So much or so little thought can go into this thing that most of us use every day.

THE HOST GIFT
Jonathan Adler’s Druggist summer collection, in porcelain with gold accents, is “elegant”, says the designer, “but the iconography? Not so much.” The work is a “hymn to the hippie-dippie counterculture of the 60s, an era that kind of made the idea of ​​being a potter a thing.”

THE WATER CARRIER
The founder and designer of ANIMATE OBJECTS, Alayna Wiley, situates her products in a folk and community-oriented tradition. “Clay works have a beautiful way of bringing people together,” Wiley says. “When making ceramic objects, it is almost never a solitary activity, especially in a city where kiln space is limited – there are always people sharing a ceramic workshop!”

SETTING UP
The mission of the People’s Pottery Project, a Los Angeles-based collective, is “to employ and empower formerly incarcerated women, trans and non-binary people through paid job training, access to a healing community and meaningful employment.

Hit a Posy

Three floral artists propose to appropriate the art of arrangement.

ROSAILLE

“I want my work to evoke movement and explore the idea of ​​performance,” says Lutfi Janania, who creates fresh architectural bouquets – bromeliads and orchids are favorites for showy impact – and dried botanicals in her studio. based in Brooklyn.

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