Ceramics – African Art Products http://africanartproducts.com/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 16:37:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://africanartproducts.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon.png Ceramics – African Art Products http://africanartproducts.com/ 32 32 pottery classes near me MetroWest Milford Framingham ceramics https://africanartproducts.com/pottery-classes-near-me-metrowest-milford-framingham-ceramics/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 09:30:15 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/pottery-classes-near-me-metrowest-milford-framingham-ceramics/ Creating art to give as gifts to friends and family may sound like something out of a kids’ art class, but at several local studios and businesses, making things is great for all ages. Hannah Carleton knows this firsthand. She took up ceramics in college “just as a fun lesson and a stress reliever – […]]]>

Creating art to give as gifts to friends and family may sound like something out of a kids’ art class, but at several local studios and businesses, making things is great for all ages.

Hannah Carleton knows this firsthand. She took up ceramics in college “just as a fun lesson and a stress reliever – and fell in love with it.”

Now the 28-year-old is the proud owner of PYOP Studio in Northborough. The pottery shop offers paintable biscuit clothing: everything from cups and trays to ornaments, fairy houses and animals of all shapes and sizes. Plus, there are a lot of gnomes and gnome houses, which her mother loves, she says.

Bisqueware is clay that has been fired at least once – and is ready for painting or glazing before returning to the kiln for a final firing. PYOP offers painting and clay classes, where customers can come in, paint an object and pick it up a week later.

Carleton was able to ride out the pandemic through grants and by offering contactless pick-up of paint-to-go paint kits, which was a huge success — first over the phone and then on its new website.

After: The pandemic has pushed businesses online – and they’re grateful

“A lot of times when people walk through the door just to check, they ask me if they have to have any talent or ability to be able to do this,” she said. “Absolutely not.”

Also, “people like to be able to create something they can use.”

get your hands dirty

“My whole business model has gone from little kids and after-school art to adults wanting to paint, hand-build and make clay,” said Kathy Wotton, owner of Arts Studio in Bellingham, who offers ceramics classes for 10 year olds. and up to.

Artworks Studio operates out of ConnectEd & Inspired, also an art space. Both companies will soon be moving to new premises in town.

Wotton said she suspects a few factors were at play in more people wanting to get their hands dirty and do things; the popularity of “The Great Pottery Throw Down”, which looks a bit like the Great British Bake-Off, but where contestants are covered in clay rather than flour; companies offering wheels that are cheaper than a laptop; and people coming out of the pandemic wanting to take up new hobbies.

Additionally, video content on YouTube and TikTok has brought ceramics to new audiences.

But YouTube tutorials aren’t necessarily all you need. Handling clay on the wheel is all about muscles, tension and breathing — and the stress doesn’t help, Wotton explained.

“I’ve had kids walk into the studio and say, ‘I watched YouTube, maybe I don’t need your help,'” she said. “It gave them a little bit of confidence – and they’re the people who go down the fastest.”

How to throw a pot

Wotton said it can be hard for people to pursue a hobby they’re going to fail at — a lot, at least at first. She likened tossing a pot to a dance, with a definite motion for each step of manipulating the clay: centering the ball, turning it into a flat disc, finding the middle of that disc to press a hole into it to form the pot. , opening up, then pulling the clay from the bottom to form the walls.

“It’s one of those things like yoga. You’re here to work out,” she said. in a few, because it takes time.”

When students take pottery classes in college, they are often given practical exercises like throwing a dozen cylinders and then throwing them. But for new potters, having nothing to show of their working hours can be daunting, so Wotton will guide them to ensure they have at least one thing to show at the end of the course for their progress. The initial wobbly bowls may not make great gifts, but even a twisted vessel can hold water, jewelry, or a plant.

Handcrafting is also an option. Handmaking, another ceramic technique, involves cutting and pressing together slabs and shapes to create objects. It’s extremely free compared to wheel throwing in part because the clay doesn’t move while you’re working on it.

Meet sensory needs: MetroWest Organizations More Autism-Friendly

Wotton said it can be difficult for new students to let go of the perfectionist part of themselves: if you keep tugging and tugging on a piece, playing with walls and the profile of a pot on the wheel, the whole thing can collapse.

“We’re all about the wonky pots,” she said, because those initial wonky bowls can still hold paperclips, jewelry, or even a plant. “Every mistake brings you closer to doing well…they have to do everything wrong first.

(Mental Health

Carleton said painting your own pottery was popular during the pandemic and beyond because it was something everyone could participate in. For the art-inclined artists, they could paint intricate designs, and for the less creative, multiple layers of glaze would melt together in one go in the kiln, giving each piece a personal touch.

And there are plenty of tips and tricks. The pencil, for example, burns out while being drawn, so painting something intricate could be as simple as just coloring inside the lines.

Painting pottery “didn’t necessarily get people out of the house, just being home, alone and isolated, and having nothing to do – and I think people are realizing how much such things affect their mental health,” Carleton said. “Having activities that they could do during this time has been helpful for people and I think post-pandemic people really enjoy trying to keep that in their lives.”

Wotton said his students also experience a sense of timelessness in the classroom. They are often surprised that two hours have passed while they were working the clay.

“My students often say to me, ‘I haven’t thought about my work for the past two hours,'” Wotton said. “It gives the mind time to rest, even if it is concentrating on something else.”

She said she hoped there could be more creative spaces for people of all ages in Bellingham and beyond.

“I think being able to provide space for people to have an opportunity to relax and do something fun can contribute to good health,” Carleton added. “It’s great for everyone.”

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Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Forecast, Trend Analysis to 2028 | Kyoceras, CeramTec, 3M, Ortech, Toshiba – The Colby Echo News https://africanartproducts.com/silicon-nitride-ceramics-consumption-market-forecast-trend-analysis-to-2028-kyoceras-ceramtec-3m-ortech-toshiba-the-colby-echo-news/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 03:15:01 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/silicon-nitride-ceramics-consumption-market-forecast-trend-analysis-to-2028-kyoceras-ceramtec-3m-ortech-toshiba-the-colby-echo-news/ New Jersey, United States,- The latest published study on the Global Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market offers a detailed overview of the factors influencing the global business scope. The Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market research report presents the latest market information, an analysis of the current situation with upcoming trends and breakdown of products and […]]]>

New Jersey, United States,- The latest published study on the Global Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market offers a detailed overview of the factors influencing the global business scope. The Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market research report presents the latest market information, an analysis of the current situation with upcoming trends and breakdown of products and services. The report provides key statistics on the market status, size, share and growth factors of the Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market. The study also provides information on past and current market trends and developments, drivers, capabilities, technologies, and changes in market capital structure. The study will help market players and market consultants to understand the continuing structure of the Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market. Our analysts monitoring the situation around the world explain that the market will generate remunerative prospects for producers after the COVID-19 crisis. The report aims to provide an additional illustration of the latest scenario, economic downturn and the impact of COVID-19 on the overall industry.

Get Sample PDF (Including Tables & Figures, Graphs & Graphs) of Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Research Report@ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/download-sample/?rid=371335

The report endeavors to offer a 360-degree analysis of the global Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market based on an in-depth study of current demand and supply trends, significant fiscal statistics of major market players and the influence of the latest economic trends. advances in the market. Developments in each geographical region are mapped using authentic historical data to help gauge the future trajectory of the market across the globe. A SWOT analysis is carried out to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that these companies expect to see during the forecast period.

Key companies:

  • Kyoceras
  • CeramTec
  • 3M
  • Ortech
  • Toshiba
  • Coorstek
  • Morgan Advanced Materials
  • Ferrotec
  • Syallons
  • roger
  • America
  • Honsin ceramics
  • Fraunhofer IKTS
  • Winsted Precision Bullet
  • Hoover Precision Products
  • Industrial Tectonics Inc
  • Precision ceramics
  • Sinoma
  • Unipretec
  • Jinsheng
  • FCRI
  • Zibo Silicon Nitride Products
  • Shichao
  • HSCCER
  • Kaifa
  • Mokai

Segment by types:

Segment by applications:

  • Aerospace components
  • cutting tools
  • Rolling Rolling Elements
  • Automotive components (rollers/pads)
  • Oil and Gas Components Industry
  • Mining components
  • Other

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Impact of COVID-19 on the Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Industry: Coronavirus recession is an economic recession occurring in the global economy in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic could affect three main aspects of the global economy: production, the supply chain, as well as businesses and financial markets. The report offers a comprehensive version of the Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market which will include the impact of COVID-19 and the anticipated changes on the future outlook of the industry, considering political, economic, social and technologies.

Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market: Regional Analysis includes:

Asia Pacific (Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia and Australia)
Europe (Turkey, Germany, Russia UK, Italy, France, etc.)
North America (United States, Mexico and Canada)
South America (Brazil, etc)
The Middle East and Africa (GCC countries and Egypt)

Contents

Global Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market 2015-2026, with capacity, sales, production, export, import, revenue, price, cost, and distribution data gross margin

Chapter 1. Presentation of the report

Chapter 2. Market overview

2.1 Presentation of the main companies

2.2 Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Concentration

2.3 Six years Compound annual growth rate (CAGR)

chapter 3.Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Value Chain

3.1 Upstream

3.2 Downstream

3.3 Porter’s Five Forces Analysis and SWOT Analysis

Chapter 4. Player Profiles

4.1 Company Profiles

4.2 Product presentation

4.3 Production, income (2015-2020)

4.4 SWOT analysis

Chapter 5. Global Ceramic Silicon Nitride Consumption Market Analysis by Regions

5.1 Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Status and Outlook (2016-2026)

5.2 Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Size and Growth Rate (2016-2026)

5.3 Local Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Capacity, Import, Export, Local Consumption Analysis (2015-2026)

Chapter 6. North America Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Analysis by Country

Chapter 7. China Silicon Nitride Ceramic Consumption Market Analysis by Country

Chapter 8. Europe Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 9. Asia-Pacific Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 10. India Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 11. Middle East & Africa Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 12. South America Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Analysis by Countries

Chapter 13. Global Silicon Nitride Ceramic Consumption Market Segment By Type

Chapter 14. Global Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market Segment By Application:

Chapter 15. Silicon Nitride Ceramic Consumption Market Forecast by Regions (2020-2026)

Chapter 16. Annex

Browse Full Report or TOC of Silicon Nitride Ceramics Consumption Market @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/product/global-silicon-nitride-ceramics-consumption-market-size-and-forecast/

The report includes the following questions:

  • What is the expected growth rate of the global silicon nitride ceramic consumption market during the forecast period?
  • Which regional segment is estimated to account for a massive share of the global Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market?
  • What are the key factors driving the global Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market?
  • What are the vital challenges faced by the major players in the Global Silicon Nitride Ceramic Consumption Market?
  • What current trends are likely to offer promising growth prospects in the coming years?
  • How is the competitive landscape of the global silicon nitride ceramics consumption market currently?
  • What are the key factors driving the global Silicon Nitride Ceramics consumption market?
  • How has covid-19 impacted the growth of the?
  • What latest trends are anticipated to offer prospected growth potential in the years to come?

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Mud Dept: local handcrafted ceramics celebrating slow life https://africanartproducts.com/mud-dept-local-handcrafted-ceramics-celebrating-slow-life/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 20:26:15 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/mud-dept-local-handcrafted-ceramics-celebrating-slow-life/ posted on September 26, 2022 Lea Durie has been involved in a long love affair with ceramics, drawn to the intimacy, connection to the earth and storytelling abilities of this ancient craft. Léa recently launched her online business, mud department, and expanded her studio into a permanent location in Braidwood, where she creates breathtaking vessels. […]]]>

posted on

Lea Durie has been involved in a long love affair with ceramics, drawn to the intimacy, connection to the earth and storytelling abilities of this ancient craft.

Léa recently launched her online business, mud department, and expanded her studio into a permanent location in Braidwood, where she creates breathtaking vessels. Fostering a love of the “slow life”, his work is a refreshing change of pace.

Lea has always had a natural affinity for creating and crafting with her hands. Intoxicated by the process of transformation, her first introduction to ceramics dates back to her childhood, where a little turtle cultivated a great love.

“I’ve always been a maker, but I had that experience as a kid, and we moved to Melbourne for a short time, and the school I went to had a ceramics workshop.

“And I have to do this little turtle, and she was fired and came back. And it was just amazing, and I fell in love with clay. And that’s something I’ve always wanted to go back to,” she said.

It’s a passion that has continued to darken her life, as she remains captivated by the tactile nature, fluidity and mutability of clay. Now owner of a thriving business, Mud Dept. is intimately Lea.

With delicate folds and an earth-bound color palette, his breathtaking vessels tell a story of place and nature, a longstanding motif in his pieces.

“I’ve always been drawn to good modernist design and clean lines, but I also like to bring that earthy quality and twist it so it retains heat and creates an invitation to use.”

“But I’m also interested in exploring how we use land and how we and the impact that land use might have on the environment, so it’s really trying to tell that story. And so, in making my pieces, I really try to make them out of the ground using a lot of texture in the process.

As you scroll through her website, this beautiful tale comes to life effortlessly in black and mist-striped pots, lichen forest bowls, delicately crafted mugs and richly layered vases ready to hold native flowers. wild.

She is not afraid to experiment with dimension, texture and subtle (but perfectly adapted) colors brought to light by the alchemy of natural materials. And while Lea is undeniably a master of her craft, she always strives to enhance her creative touch and play with design elements from around the world.

“I find inspiration by perfecting my art and honing my skills, and just working to improve myself and creating works that I can be truly proud of.

“I get a lot of inspiration from other manufacturers and other designers, and different styles in different places, like I love Scandinavian design. And I think that influences a lot of my work. But I also love very much the Japanese approach.

You can’t help but be captivated by Lea’s fascinating storytelling ability. Each vase is an invitation to pause, reflect and breathe deeply.

“I want to bring together a story of place and this story of creating things that come from a place. Create a moment of slowing down, becoming aware, and living a more intentional life.

As Lea reflects on her long love affair with ceramics, she is excited to begin bringing people into her world. On October 1 and 2, she has an open studio, something she hopes to continue in the future.

And while Mud Dept. continues to grow and expand, Lea is excited to reach a wider audience, with the hope that one day she too can ignite the burning flame that is this magical craft.

“Teaching is something that interests me and I plan to do some workshops. I love to learn and am always doing workshops myself and learning new things. And I think once people get their hands on clay, they’ll love it. I would like to be the person who allows this addiction,” says Lea.

There may be a little turtle that lives in all of us.

The essential

What: Mud Dept. Handmade ceramics
When: Lea’s open studio, 10-4 Saturday and Sunday October 1, 2
Where: 63 Monkittee Street Braidwood
Web: www.muddept.com

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Hydroxyapatite Ceramic Market Research Reveals Explosive Growth https://africanartproducts.com/hydroxyapatite-ceramic-market-research-reveals-explosive-growth/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 13:54:00 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/hydroxyapatite-ceramic-market-research-reveals-explosive-growth/ Hydroxyapatite Ceramic Hydroxyapatite Ceramic Market Research Report 2022 Provides insights on market dynamics affecting the market, market scope, its segmentation and overlays shadow on major market players to underline their advantageous competitive surroundings and current trends. The size of the Hydroxyapatite Ceramics market is growing faster than in previous years, and the market is predicted […]]]>

Hydroxyapatite Ceramic

Hydroxyapatite Ceramic Market Research Report 2022 Provides insights on market dynamics affecting the market, market scope, its segmentation and overlays shadow on major market players to underline their advantageous competitive surroundings and current trends. The size of the Hydroxyapatite Ceramics market is growing faster than in previous years, and the market is predicted to expand significantly between 2022 and 2029. Experts have studied the market drivers, restraints, risks, and opportunities. Along with its assessments, the Hydroxyapatite Ceramics market study outlines the most probable future direction of the market.

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The hydroxyapatite ceramic market is segmented by key players, type and application. Growth in all segments allows for accurate assessments and forecasts of sales by type and by application in terms of volume and value for the period 2022-2029. You can grow your business by focusing on suitable niche markets with the support of this research.

Main Key Players

◘ Orchid
◘ Biotal Plasma
◘ Sigma Registry
◘ Fluidinova
◘ Prodways
◘ BioRad
◘ Shanghai Bio-lu Biomaterials
◘ Nano interface technology
◘ Zimmer Biomet
◘ Biological Materials Engineering Research Center of Sichuan University
◘ Bioceramic CAM

Type

◘ Porous hydroxyapatite ceramic
◘ Dense Hydroxyapatite Ceramic

Application

◘ Orthopedics
◘ Dental
◘ Biochemical research
◘ Others

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The report offers an in-depth look at the industry and focuses on the key elements driving market growth in the coming years as well as those restraining it. The report also covers the names of the major market players and the tactics they used to acquire the majority of the market. Additionally, it provides interesting insights into the market, current Hydroxyapatite Ceramics industry trends and significant market advancements.

Growth mapping:

The objective of the study is to provide clients with a map of market growth and help them formulate plans to achieve their business goals. A range of quantitative and qualitative techniques can be used to examine market expansion. In order to assess many variables such as buyer and seller capabilities, substitution effects, level of competition and threats from new players, these methodologies include SWOT analyzes of different markets, PESTEL studies for different geographical areas and analyzes of Porter’s five forces.

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Regional analysis

The geographical study examines the size of the industry along with a detailed analysis of the key players across the globe.

❋ The Middle East and Africa (Turkey, GCC countries, Egypt, South Africa)

❋ North America (United States, Mexico and Canada)

❋ South America (Brazil etc.)

❋ Europe (Germany, Russia, UK, Italy, France, etc.)

❋ Asia-Pacific (Vietnam, China, Malaysia, Japan, Philippines, Korea, Thailand, India, Indonesia and Australia)

Sample reports contain

➤ Market analysis
➤ Industry Segment
➤ Growing trends
➤ Graphic representation of size, share and trends
➤ Investment Opportunities
➤ Regional assessment
➤ Analyzes of cost structures
➤ Competitive environment Disadvantages and difficulties of the sector
➤ Methodology Facts and Influences
➤ Value chain and sales analysis
➤ Market Prediction

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This press release was published on openPR.

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University of Iowa School of Art and Art History Hosts First Ceramic Invitational Show https://africanartproducts.com/university-of-iowa-school-of-art-and-art-history-hosts-first-ceramic-invitational-show/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 00:09:06 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/university-of-iowa-school-of-art-and-art-history-hosts-first-ceramic-invitational-show/ The first of nine invitations to the program, the Ceramics Invitational Show features the work of more than 50 graduate students and faculty from six universities, including the University of Iowa. Alongside the exhibition, there will be a related symposium on September 22-23, with guest lectures, demonstrations and tours. Step inside the echoing four stories […]]]>

The first of nine invitations to the program, the Ceramics Invitational Show features the work of more than 50 graduate students and faculty from six universities, including the University of Iowa. Alongside the exhibition, there will be a related symposium on September 22-23, with guest lectures, demonstrations and tours.


Step inside the echoing four stories of the University of Iowa Visual Arts Building, and visitors will have a choice: go straight into the open Lasansky Atrium or turn left into the sunny Drewelowe Gallery . There is a third option, however – is the hidden Ana Mendieta Gallery on the second floor.

Hosted in three different spaces, UI’s first Ceramics Invitational Show showcases the creative work of more than 50 faculty and graduate students from six different universities, all carefully selected by Andrew Casto, Head of the School of Ceramics Program. art and art history and associate professor.

Last year, Casto said the school’s director of art and art history, Steve McGuire, came up with the idea of ​​holding a national exhibit in each of the school’s departments. Once accepted, ceramics was chosen first, and Casto began deciding which outside school programs UI would invite.

After ceramics, the school’s other nine programs will go through their own invitations over the next three years. Casto said he hopes to hold the Ceramics Invitational Show again in 2025.

“When we organize an exhibition like this, we provide a space for dialogue between people who make ceramics in higher education institutions than our research institutions,” Casto said.

Coming from schools where many UI graduate students come from, as well as other unrelated universities, Casto said the peers he landed on were the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; The University of Colorado, Boulder; The University of Florida, Gainesville; Penn State University; and the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, as well as students from UI’s own program.

The works of artists from each of these schools have been carefully preserved in the three spaces of the visual arts building. The pieces were exhibited on August 29 and will be on display until September 30.

Transforming into the usually quiet Drewelowe Gallery, guests are struck by the sound of soft chirping insects from a piece titled night song by University of Florida faculty member Jesse Ring, placed in the center of the room.

Ceramics of all materials fill the area, flooding from the floors to the walls. On the back wall hangs a circular ceramic piece with a color wheel: blue, purple, green, orange, yellow. Standing closer, the viewer will see wooden matches and a matching striker on the side.

Shannon Goff’s work Balsamic Circle was inspired at the height of the pandemic. Goff is the head of ceramics at the Penn State School of Visual Arts and an associate professor of art. When Goff reflected on what got her through this tough time, she noted incense burning – which, like ceramics, involves mixing a wet mass and a dry mass.

RELATED: ‘A Yellow Rose Project’ Celebrates Centennial of UI’s 19th Amendment

“I thought if I was going to do a job like this, I should definitely figure out how to make incense and go all the way, not halfway through it,” Goff said. “I eventually learned that making incense is not unlike making small batches of scented clay.”

His goal with the piece is to allow the viewer to explore and discover an imaginary landscape, find all the separate pieces – the incense, the matches and the attacker – and ultimately participate in the work.

Goff will join UI and other schools involved in taking a look at the work of the Invitational and engaging in the associated symposium on September 22-23. The symposium will include a lecture by renowned contemporary ceramicist Amy Santoferraro, as well as demonstrations by various faculty members and a tour of the newly opened Stanley Museum of Art.

Casto said he looks forward to the community aspect of the symposium. When organizing the event, he did so thinking about how he could help his students.

“My hope is that our students will connect with faculty from other schools that they might populate down the road, that they will befriend other artists at other institutions, and then that exhibitions or opportunities happen because of that,” Casto said.

Casto’s duo of pieces in the show, Untitled Accumulation Ships, can be found in the vast, sunken atrium of the art building. The pieces consist of large porcelain jugs that study shape, color and form, in the tradition of his years of working with the material.

The surface treatment of precious metals, including real gold, sparkles in the light drawing the eye from other intricate pieces in the atrium.

Going up to the second floor, in the Ana Mendieta Gallery, visitors can find another room filled with diverse ceramic art.

UI Iowa Idea Visiting Professor of Ceramics Sydney Erwerth’s bright red and orange shaded table is located in the center of the room. She said she draws on her interest in architecture during her creative process, often using materials like clay, plaster, resin and grout.

The piece has two titles – a common theme among his ceramic pieces. In this case, the table is titled Building something from nothing / What happens at the dinner table stays at the dinner table.

The inspiration behind the confusing-looking structure on top of the table, Erwerth said, stems from the energy in a moment between people at a table.

“A table can mean a first date, a table can mean a serious conversation between parent and child, it can mean a family dinner, it’s like a gathering place,” Erwerth said.

Whichever space a ceramic-loving guest visits first, there will be a radiant variety of contemporary pieces to look at, crafted by students and faculty from across the country.

“I’m thrilled that this community is coming together,” Erwerth said. “I have seen that in different ceramic communities in different universities, the ceramic studio cannot just have one person to thrive, you need a team.”

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Earley receives scholarship, attends festival as master of ceramics https://africanartproducts.com/earley-receives-scholarship-attends-festival-as-master-of-ceramics/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 14:34:50 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/earley-receives-scholarship-attends-festival-as-master-of-ceramics/ Gulgong Festival Masters Exhibition in April 2022 The Idaho Arts Commission recently awarded Caroline Earley, a professor in the Department of Art, Design, and Visual Studies, a 2023 fellowship in visual arts along with two other Idaho artists. The awards, given biennially by the Idaho Commission on the Arts, honor outstanding artists, honoring works deemed […]]]>
Gulgong Festival Masters Exhibition in April 2022
Photo of Caroline Earley spinning clay on a wheel.  Photo by Bridgit Willis.

The Idaho Arts Commission recently awarded Caroline Earley, a professor in the Department of Art, Design, and Visual Studies, a 2023 fellowship in visual arts along with two other Idaho artists. The awards, given biennially by the Idaho Commission on the Arts, honor outstanding artists, honoring works deemed to exhibit the highest artistic merit upon peer review. Out-of-state panelists review applications anonymously in a highly competitive process that assesses existing work and work history. The Idaho State Legislature and the National Endowment for the Arts fund the scholarship.

Additionally, Earley attended the Clay Gulgong Festival in New South Wales, Australia in April 2022 as a guest master. The internationally renowned festival, an unmissable event for world ceramics, regularly brings together national and international artists.

“It was a real honor to be selected for the Visual Arts Scholarship and Master for the International Ceramic Arts Festival, Clay Gulgong this year,” said Earley. “The Idaho Arts Commission has been very supportive of my work and I am grateful to have received this award. I have also always wanted to participate in Clay Gulgong and was thrilled to receive the invitation.

During the festival, Earley took part in a demonstration with Roz Hall, a recent Australian National University graduate.

Photo of a ceramic work of art titled "Stasis X" by Caroline Earley
“Stasis X” by Caroline Earley
Photo of a ceramic work of art titled "Melee V - Iteration IV" by Caroline Earley
“Clinch V – Iteration IV” by Caroline Earley

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Transforming Loss: Ceramics Exhibit at La Jolla Library Touch the Heart of Grief https://africanartproducts.com/transforming-loss-ceramics-exhibit-at-la-jolla-library-touch-the-heart-of-grief/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 17:00:09 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/transforming-loss-ceramics-exhibit-at-la-jolla-library-touch-the-heart-of-grief/ Facing the death of a loved one earlier this year, Amelia Eastman felt a range of emotions. To help her heal, she used clay to create hearts and other sculptures to understand what was going on in her own heart. “There were times when I felt like my heart had a hole in it, so […]]]>

Facing the death of a loved one earlier this year, Amelia Eastman felt a range of emotions. To help her heal, she used clay to create hearts and other sculptures to understand what was going on in her own heart.

“There were times when I felt like my heart had a hole in it, so I put a hole in one of those hearts of clay,” she said. “There were times when I felt like my heart was broken and loosely put back together, so one is split in two and put back together in a new way, because that’s how I felt. Some have paths in them because I felt lost.

A collection of Eastman pieces is on display at the La Jolla/Riford Library in a display case near the main entrance, along with a notepad for people to write down what helped them through their bereavement. There is also a container to place the notes. The collection was installed this month and will continue through October.

“Grief is so personal, and so is how you deal with it,” Eastman said. “I wanted to hear their stories. I want to learn from others.

Eastman, a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist at UC San Diego in La Jolla, said she wanted to create the exhibit to “present those who are grieving with an idea” of how to heal.

“In my job, people open up to me and there are a lot of people who are grieving,” she said. “The pandemic has caused a lot of change, and there are people struggling with loss.”

Eastman became one of them when her loved one died in February (she wouldn’t release any further information about the person or the nature of the death). Around this time, the UCSD Crafts Center reopened after its predecessor closed and was demolished in 2012. The new 11,000 square foot Crafts Center is open to the public when not hosting classes or of workshop.

“I did ceramics for a long time, but then I took a break,” Eastman said. “Having a tangible form in your hand that you can hold, adjust, give…was important.”

In the exhibit are hearts and other sculptures that Eastman made at the Craft Center to show the different feelings associated with the loss of a loved one. There is also a QR code that links to a video showing the storefront creation process.

“Grieving is so personal, and so is how you deal with it,” says Amelia Eastman.

(Courtesy of Amelia Eastman)

Producing the exhibit “helped me take something unimaginable and complex and turn it into something purely emotional,” she said. “It’s wonderful to take something so overwhelming and make it simple and manageable.”

Eastman said she wanted to have the exhibit at the La Jolla Library because “I love this library” and she thought it would reach a variety of people.

“La Jolla/Riford Library is often on the lookout for meaningful examples of community art, and Amelia Eastman’s bereavement-themed sculptures are deep and very personal,” said Branch Manager Bill Mallory. “Besides their artistic merit, they also spark much-needed discussion on the subject and allow the feelings of library patrons to be part of the exhibit.”

Works by Amelia Eastman are displayed in a display case near the main entrance to the La Jolla/Riford Library.

Works by Amelia Eastman are displayed in a display case near the main entrance to the La Jolla/Riford Library.

(Ashley Mackin-Solomon)

Overall, Eastman finds the work “exciting and aesthetically pleasing,” she said. “It’s exciting for me to see an emotion that I had sent back to me, but it’s different to look back at myself. I don’t feel the same sadness as when I did. The product didn’t not the same feeling. He feels transformed, and that’s something I’m proud of.

The La Jolla/Riford Library is located at 7555 Draper Ave. Hours of operation are 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday and Tuesday and 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. Learn more about lajolllibrary.org. ◆

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Derek Andrews obituary | Ceramic https://africanartproducts.com/derek-andrews-obituary-ceramic/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:47:00 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/derek-andrews-obituary-ceramic/ My brother, Derek Andrews, who died aged 89, was a much loved potter and painter living in Cambridgeshire, helped by his wife, Margot, also an artist, with whom he ran a successful pottery. Derek had trained, for a period of six months in 1958, with the eminent artist Bernard Leach at his pottery in St […]]]>

My brother, Derek Andrews, who died aged 89, was a much loved potter and painter living in Cambridgeshire, helped by his wife, Margot, also an artist, with whom he ran a successful pottery. Derek had trained, for a period of six months in 1958, with the eminent artist Bernard Leach at his pottery in St Ives, Cornwall; he also became a talented landscape painter.

Diagnosed with cancer last year, Derek chose not to undergo chemotherapy and, at the age of 88, instead turned to a new discipline: metal sculpting. He tapped into a sense of well-being which culminated in a successful exhibition of his work last winter at the Old Fire Engine House in Ely.

Born in Croydon, Surrey (now the London Borough of Croydon), Derek was the son of Fanny (née Maybourn), who had worked for a Harley Street doctor, and Arthur Andrews, a railway signaller. He was educated at Archbishop Tenison’s School, Croydon, and on leaving at 16 went to work in the local council office. A period of national service in the army followed, during which Derek realized that consulting work was not for him. Much to our parents’ disapproval, he said he wanted to be a potter. (“It’s not work, it’s a hobby,” Arthur said.)

Derek Andrews in his studio with Jive, his latest creation

Undaunted, Derek won a place in 1952 at Bretton Hall teacher training college in Yorkshire, where he met Margot, whose surname coincidentally was also Andrews, a talented painter trained at the Slade School of London art.

In 1955 they married and for the next 20 years both taught at schools and colleges in Suffolk and Fen country. Derek was then invited to teach ceramics part-time at Bretton Hall, which gave him the opportunity to complete a National Design Diploma at Leeds College of Art, and experience working with plaster molds and slip casting.

In 1974, Derek and Margot felt the need to change. They wanted to give up teaching to run their own pottery and started looking at a number of potential buildings in the Fen area.

Eventually they found a ramshackle coal store in a village near Ely which over the next 20 years became not only their home but also the successful Prickwillow pottery. There they produced a regular line of products for sale, including mugs, jugs, dolls, house plates and the hugely popular ‘Jack Spratt’ gravy boat. They retired in 1995 to live in Cambridge and more recently in Ely.

Derek loved music and the arts, and was blessed with relentless creativity. He was also a man of kindness and patience. Having enjoyed the success of Ely’s exhibition, he requested neither a funeral nor a memorial, stating, “This exhibition of my work is my final gesture in a full life, thus creating my own memorial occasion.”

Derek is survived by Margot, me, and his nephews, Jeremy and Dan, and his niece, Nicky.

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Huntley woman, 83, marched for women’s rights, creates ceramics honoring activists on display at McHenry County College – Shaw Local https://africanartproducts.com/huntley-woman-83-marched-for-womens-rights-creates-ceramics-honoring-activists-on-display-at-mchenry-county-college-shaw-local/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 18:42:06 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/huntley-woman-83-marched-for-womens-rights-creates-ceramics-honoring-activists-on-display-at-mchenry-county-college-shaw-local/ During Elaine Kadakia’s 83rd birthday, she marched in Springfield for women’s rights, stood up to raise awareness of violence against women, and raised her two daughters. Now Kadakia, from Huntley, makes ceramic art depicting the struggle for equality she has seen women endure over the years. Some of his favorite pieces are on display at […]]]>

During Elaine Kadakia’s 83rd birthday, she marched in Springfield for women’s rights, stood up to raise awareness of violence against women, and raised her two daughters.

Now Kadakia, from Huntley, makes ceramic art depicting the struggle for equality she has seen women endure over the years. Some of his favorite pieces are on display at McHenry County College in an exhibit called “A Journey in Ceramic Activist Art,” which runs through Monday.

“Each piece represents a certain moment in my life,” Kadakia said.

The exhibit, which includes around 20 pieces, is the first for Kadakia, who now lives with her husband in the Sun City community of Del Webb in Huntley. But it took a lifetime to do.

In the 1960s Kadakia earned a bachelor’s degree from the Art Institute of Chicago.

She grew up in Chicago and is Jewish and married to Jayant Kadakia, her husband of 54 years, originally from Mumbai, India, and practicing Hinduism. The marriage prompted more than 15 trips to India to visit her husband’s family.

These trips, Kadakia said, also exposed her to how women are treated in some parts of the world. The tours showed him the beautiful colors of Indian culture and the sarees worn by women seen in his ceramic pieces. All these elements have inspired his collection of ceramics.

She has lived her life raising two daughters and advocating for women’s rights with her voice and through her art.

Kadakia has been an active member of the American Association of University Women, which values ​​and promotes equality for women in the workplace, reproductive rights and the advancement of women in leadership roles, she said. declared.

She marched with her two young daughters at the 1976 Equal Rights Amendment rally in Springfield, where her husband worked for the state of Illinois and where they raised their family before moving to the McHenry County area in 2001.

She has also taken part in recent efforts in McHenry County to promote women’s rights, including the recent march for women’s reproductive rights in Woodstock.

McHenry County College student Elaine Kadakia, 83, works to create a piece of ceramic art Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022, in the college's pottery studio.

Her youngest daughter, Maya Kadakia, recalls that when she was growing up in Springfield, her mother created the art of pointillism at the kitchen table and taught art classes at a Jewish temple and in a home. of retirement. She also remembers participating in ERA rallies and a Take Back the Night protest against violence against women when she was in college.

“She helped make me the feminist I am today,” her daughter said. “She’s always been incredibly supportive of me being independent, doing what I want to do, wearing what I want to wear, and being a full human being.”

Maya Kadakia, who is now an artist and teaches middle school social studies and traditional Guinean dance at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said her mother made her feel important in this world, even as a youngster. daughter. She not only marched with her mother for the protection of women, but designed the T-shirts worn during the march depicting silhouettes of women dancing under a night sky.

She said she was “grateful” to her mother.

“It’s really great to be taken seriously at such a young age and to be in a community of diverse women all working towards the same goal,” she said. “I’m really grateful to my mom for being such a supporter of this.”

Elaine Kadakia, 83, right, a student at McHenry County College, speaks with her instructor Tom Vician about her art Thursday, September 8, 2022 at the college.

About her mother’s works, Maya Kadakia said she was inspired by “the way she lets her spirit shine through”.

At a young age, Elaine Kadakia said she realized art could “send powerful and meaningful messages”.

Describing Elaine Kadakia’s approach to her ceramic projects, her instructor Tom Vician said, “She is fearless. »

“She pushes the boundaries of clay,” Vician said. “Her works are always based on ideas. Everything she creates comes from an idea that she has first, and then she creates the work.

And this “idea” for Kadakia is women, women’s rights, their oppression and their passion.

“She likes to take risks and she’s not afraid to take risks when starting new projects. She just goes for it, she doesn’t hold back,” said Vician, who teaches traditional forming techniques in her class, such as wheel throwing and hand building, as well as newer techniques such as 3D printing, cooking with soda. and formulation of glazes.

Ceramic activist art created by Elaine Kadakia, 83, a student at McHenry County College, is on display at the college gallery through Monday, September 19, 2022.

Vician said Kadakia is skilled in traditional 5,000-year-old techniques of wheel throwing and hand building. But she also works with new techniques. She’s also not afraid to mix techniques, as seen in her pieces “Women Emerging, 2020” and “We Paved the Way to Women’s Right to Vote,” depicting Susan B. Anthony and other prominent women. in the women’s suffrage movement.

“I always try to come up with something new and interesting every semester, and she’s always up for exploring a new technique,” Vician said.

Of her very first show, Vician said, “Elaine absorbs it all. She’s on cloud nine and it’s wonderful to see.

Vician is exploring opportunities to share Kadakia’s showcase with other universities and community colleges.

Kadakia’s exhibit is in the Art Space room, A-144, near parking lot B, across from the gymnasium. Information about art courses offered at McHenry County College is available at www.mchenry.edu/art/.

CORRECTION: This article has been updated to correct what Maya Kadakia does for a living. She teaches humanities to college students and traditional Guinean dance at the University of Wisconsin.

McHenry County College student Elaine Kadakia, 83, with some of her ceramic activist art on display Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022, at the college's gallery.
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Artist Maxwell Mustardo creates his whimsical ceramics in Quakertown, New Jersey, the studio of an illustrious predecessor https://africanartproducts.com/artist-maxwell-mustardo-creates-his-whimsical-ceramics-in-quakertown-new-jersey-the-studio-of-an-illustrious-predecessor/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 15:00:57 +0000 https://africanartproducts.com/artist-maxwell-mustardo-creates-his-whimsical-ceramics-in-quakertown-new-jersey-the-studio-of-an-illustrious-predecessor/ Before artist Maxwell Mustardo moved into his studio in Quakertown, New Jersey, it was the workspace of the late ceramicist Toshiko Takaezu. Takaezu, who died in 2011 at the age of 88, prioritized art over functionality. Much of his work is still stored in the studio and has been a lasting inspiration to Mustardo, whose […]]]>

Before artist Maxwell Mustardo moved into his studio in Quakertown, New Jersey, it was the workspace of the late ceramicist Toshiko Takaezu.

Takaezu, who died in 2011 at the age of 88, prioritized art over functionality. Much of his work is still stored in the studio and has been a lasting inspiration to Mustardo, whose forms are both organic and synthetic, indebted to classical tradition and contemporary sensibilities.

It completely transforms the clay, covering the natural surface with sprayed PVC rubber, sometimes in iridescent layers of changing colors, others in fluorescent hues that come together in matte and rough surfaces.

There are Roman-inspired amphorae, as well as Mustardo’s signature shape, a donut-like shape he dubbed the “toroid” and an elongated version called the “godron”. The work appears both organic and synthetic, classic and resolutely contemporary.

The artist’s first solo exhibition in New York, at Midtown’s Culture Object, features some 30 works, including his largest piece to date, an amphora nearly five feet tall. Ahead of the opening, Mustardo gave Artnet News insight into the space and how it shapes his practice.

“Gadroons” drying in Maxwell Mustardo’s studio. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Can you send us a photo of the most essential item in your studio and tell us why you can’t live without it?

All my work is done directly by pinching the clay with my hands. It’s a hack answer, but nothing happens without my hands: the tools come after just to polish what they’ve done. My Shimpo strapping wheels are very dear to me and relevant to almost every step of the manufacturing process.

What is the studio task on your calendar this week that you are most looking forward to?

By far my favorite part of the ceramic process is still working with wet clay. Coming back to a big wet chunk of possibility is always exciting – much of what happens next is a series of successive shrinkings of possibility.

The Shimpo strapping wheel.  Photo courtesy of Maxwell Mustardo.

The Shimpo strapping wheel. Photo courtesy of Maxwell Mustardo.

What atmosphere do you prefer when you work? Do you listen to music or podcasts, or do you prefer silence? Why?

I don’t have an absolute standard. I listen to podcasts, audiobooks, and lectures when I can easily split my attention, or classical and jazz music when I need to concentrate or when others are in the studio, and sometimes just silence when I have to. I need.

Who are your favorite artists, curators or other thinkers to follow on social media right now?

Glenn Adamson immediately comes to mind – the tireless craftsman, author, curator and critic. He processes and thinks through social media in a very interesting way.

Garth Johnson, curator of one of the greatest collections of American ceramics, at the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, has crafted many excellent exhibits illuminating this very brief but very dynamic history. His background as a maker and advocate for craftsmanship at large gives him a particularly insightful and expansive perspective.

Work in Maxwell Mustardo's studio.  Photo courtesy of the artist.

Work in Maxwell Mustardo’s studio. Photo courtesy of the artist.

When you feel stuck while preparing for a show, what do you do to get out of it?

I firmly believe in working consistently and overcoming any obstacles. I tend to make very little progress without physically working on ideas in the studio. Solutions can be found at different stages of the process: testing glazes sometimes presents a new opportunity for shape, or a design presents a shape that requires new surface treatments, etc.

Shows force me to insert bookends into an otherwise constant production flow, which helps me because I very rarely get stuck and more likely to need settings that help shape and define my production .

What trait do you most admire in a work of art? What trait do you despise the most?

When I browse museums and galleries, I take a constructive approach so that negative reactions don’t play a big role. I tend to prefer work that pushes materials in new and extreme ways. I’m a bit of a formalist when it comes to judging contemporary work. I want to be taken and absorbed by indexical information, rather than esoteric symbols. I often inwardly redeem art that I don’t particularly like by situating it in art history and rejecting the formalist approach. A broader view of history enriches everything.

Maxwell Mustardo in his studio.  Photo courtesy of the artist.

Maxwell Mustardo in his studio. Photo courtesy of the artist.

What images or objects do you look at while you work? Share your view from behind the canvas or your desk, where you spend the most time.

I usually don’t have source material with me in the studio. Drawing and research are essential but are done outside. At work, I tend to accumulate examples of different series at different stages of drying, firing, etc. This interaction can then give rise to new hybrids. My external research, as well as my practice of drawing, helps me to take greater conceptual and formal leaps.

For example, this week I created Robert C. Turner-inspired bottle shapes while listening to lectures on Lucio Fontana and watching Italian estroflessione (shaped canvas) artists like Agostino Bonalumi and Enrico Castanelli. I really enjoy absorbing these disparate takes on gesture and form.

"Maxwell Mustardo: the substance of style" to Cultural Object.  Photo courtesy of Culture Object, New York.

“Maxwell Mustardo: The Substance of Style” at Culture Object. Photo courtesy of Culture Object, New York.

What is the last exhibition you saw that marked you and why?

“Shapes from Nowhere” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art [in New York] was a once-in-a-generation exhibit featuring recently donated items from the collection of Robert Ellison, Jr., and I found it inspiring. It was exciting to see the Met put a spotlight on recent American ceramics, and I look forward to seeing how these items will be incorporated into their long-term exhibits.

What made you choose this studio over others?

I’ve been working at Toshiko Takaezu’s studio on and off since high school, when my mom’s roommate’s ex-husband, Donald Fletcher, brought me in for a visit. Having grown up a mile away, the area is very dear to me and full of lasting relationships. After having carried out multiple residencies across the country and abroad for a few years, this studio offers stability, familiarity and many novelties linked to its history.

Describe the space in three adjectives.

Revered, bucolic, expansive.

Loading the Bisque Oven at Takaezu Studio.  Photo courtesy of Maxwell Mustardo.

Loading the Bisque Oven at Takaezu Studio. Photo courtesy of Maxwell Mustardo.

How does the studio environment influence your way of working?

Given that Toshiko’s studio space has a venerable history in 20th-century ceramic art, as well as being a literal treasure trove of his work, it’s hard not to hold on to a certain level and to consider the context of my work from this angle. My work tends to evolve mainly according to an internal logic, although the environment (my available facilities and space) both dictates limits and creates possibilities. I’ve been working mostly on a smaller scale for a few years (about 24 inches tall at most) due to setup restrictions and some surgery limitations, but now Toshiko’s 72-inch by 48-inch oven has me drawn into working on a new, larger scale.

“Maxwell Mustardo: The Substance of Style” is presented at Culture Object, 344 West 38th Street, New York, from September 14 to October 28, 2022.

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